wasserman stern attorneys at law

Buyout Blues 2017

Can a landlord negotiate a buy-out agreement with a tenant at the start of a tenancy? This author believes that the answer is definitively “no.”  In March of 2015, a “buyout” provision was added to the rent law.  The legislative intent behind this amendment was to provide tenants who were negotiating a buyout agreement the

wasserman stern attorneys at law

Never Remove Co-Tenants from an Existing Lease

About two years ago, I rented a 2-bedroom apartment to two roommates.  One tenant has just notified me that she is getting married and moving out.  The remaining tenant would like the lease changed to her name only.  Is that advised? The short answer is “no,” that is not advised.  There is a general misconception

wasserman stern attorneys at law

Screening Subtenants

Can I screen new subtenants if I have no intention of adding them to the lease? The answer is “yes,” you can.  However, this author emphatically advises that you do not screen new subtenants. As many landlords know, the local rent law permits tenants to bring in subtenants under three circumstances.  One, a departing master

wasserman stern attorneys at law

Landlord/Master Tenant Relations

What are my rights as a landlord to request information from a master tenant about who else is occupying the unit? You may request anything you want. Compelling a response is a different story. There is no law that requires a tenant to divulge personal information to the landlord. Management often asks, “Can’t we require

wasserman stern attorneys at law

When Departed Son Tries to Take Over Parents’ Lease

A long-term tenant has passed away. His adult son, who previously lived in the apartment with his parents but now lives with his family in his own home, has taken over the below market rate lease. He claimed his intention had always been to return to the apartment eventually. Is there anything I can do

wasserman stern attorneys at law

Rent Rebates and Other Gimmicks

My longtime tenant recently discovered that a newly placed tenant across the hall is paying $200 less than him in monthly rent, so he asked for a rent reduction. May I agree to a temporary rent reduction? What about offering him a rebate instead? Despite what may have been stated at a recent SFAA membership